Drone Buying Guide: Purchasing Your First Camera Drone

So you’ve been thinking about getting a camera drone as of late. Know that the decision to buy a drone might be one of your most important choices you have to make in your life. It’s because many drones in today’s market aren’t cheap. Some models might even break the bank, but these will have high-end features and excellent durability levels that make up for the heft in its price tag.

Note that the drone industry is constantly making upgrades to its products. Albeit it’s important to choose wisely for your first camera drone, don’t take too long or else there’ll be a new model that’ll release into the market and you might be left wallowing at your defeat. To help make your decision-making process faster, here’s a basic guide to buying your first camera drone.

Choosing Between DIY or RTF

 When you peruse around the market for a camera drone, you might come across two well-known abbreviations: DIY or RTF. DIY stands for Do-it-Yourself, whereas RTF means Ready-to-Fly. Simply speaking, DIY camera drones come as kits, and they require some assembly before you can use it. On the other hand, RTF models, like the Smallest Camera Drone, allows owners to use the device straight out of the box.

Battery Life

 Larger and higher-end camera drones on the market will generally have a longer battery life as compared to smaller and less expensive models. Systems that are found at the higher-end of the market will let you fly the device for about 30 to 40 minutes on average. Most small camera drones will have a flight time of about 10 minutes. For the serious flyer, you might want to purchase extra batteries to maximize flight sessions.

Costs

 As mentioned in a previous section of this guide, many camera drones on the market will put a dent in your budget. As a rule of thumb, know that more expensive models will have better durability, have more features, and can generally last longer in the air as compared to cheaper units. As a first time buyer, it’s recommended to buy a  small camera drone for now so you can get the hang of flying the device. Once you deem yourself to be an expert at drone flying, you might want to go for the bigger variants. Furthermore, if you start with a basic model, you’ll less likely to cry if something bad happens to the unit, such as falling into a river or crashing into a wall.

Additional Features

 Some camera drone models will have additional features to make the entire flying experience worthwhile. For instance, some units will have better stabilization systems than most so your captured images remain stable at all times despite the drone flying rigorously through the air.

This guide might not be THAT extensive, but it does provide you with a general idea on how you should approach the process of purchasing your first camera drone.

 

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